Monday, October 01, 2012

Math as Art (Part 2)

In an earlier post on this subject (click here), I wrote briefly about the pioneering work of Michael Trott, who as "the worlds most advanced Mathematica user" has brought together like few others the realms of visual art and mathematics. Today's post contains a few selected links intended as starting points to ignite and inspire your curiosity and act as further impetus for your own look into the alluring world of mathematical art.

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The tantalizing Wolfram Research Graphics Gallery is the best place I know of to begin enjoying and appreciating the wonders of numbers in visual form:

http://gallery.wolfram.com/.

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Another interesting point of embarkation is the following page highlighting works of mathematical art exhibited at recent major conferences:

http://www.bridgesmathart.org/amsmaa.html.

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The following "Pythagorean Tree" generators are simple ways to create mathematical art of your own:

http://myweb.cwpost.liu.edu/aburns/flash/pyth4.html;

http://www.nsf.gov/news/overviews/mathematics/interactive.jsp
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Fractals are fascinating, relatively recent products of mathematical research famous for the alluring beauty and entrancing effect of their images. The internet abounds with sites devoted to the study of fractals (a simple google search will yield upward of 8 million hits!).

Here are a few to get you started:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fractal;

http://math.rice.edu/~lanius/frac/;

http://local.wasp.uwa.edu.au/~pbourke/fractals/;

http://members.cox.net/fractalenc/encyclopedia.html.

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Long Island University mathematics professor Anne Burns has published a "Gallery of Mathscapes" showing some of her works as a mathematical artist:

http://myweb.cwpost.liu.edu/aburns/gallery/gallery.htm.

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The National Science Foundation has a superb, highly accessible general mathematics site suited for lay people with more advanced interest in the subject (highlighting recent mathematical news, research, discoveries, etc.)

http://www.nsf.gov/news/overviews/mathematics/index.jsp.

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Last, but absolutely not least, is the Wolfram Functions Site. Containing "the worlds largest collection of formulas and graphics about mathematical functions," a visit here is not for the faint of heart, but for math fans who just have to "have it all:"

http://functions.wolfram.com/.

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